Total Solar Eclipse in Tennessee

On Aug. 21, 2017, people across the United States will see the sun disappear behind the moon, turning daylight into twilight, causing the temperature to drop rapidly and revealing massive streamers of light streaking through the sky around the silhouette of the moon. On that day, America will fall under the path of a total solar eclipse.  

The so-called Great American Total Solar Eclipse will darken skies all the way from Oregon to South Carolina, along a stretch of land about 70 miles (113 kilometers) wide. People who descend upon this "path of totality" for the big event are in for an unforgettable experience. Stay in Knoxville for the weekend and don't miss this once in a lifetime event! 

Reasons to stay in Knoxville for the solar eclipse event:
  • Knoxville is a mere 30 miles from the totality of the solar eclipse 
  • Knoxville is conveniently located just off I-40 and I-75, just minutes from I-81
  • Knoxville is within a day's drive of half the continental U.S.
  • Knoxville boasts 120 daily flights from more than 20 nonstop destinations from McGhee Tyson Airport (TYS), 12 miles from downtown.  

After a short drive to see the eclipse, come back to Knoxville for live music, delicious unique cuisine and tons of fun entertainment! Make it an unforgettable weekend with lots of memories!

Total Eclipse Countdown

 

Total Solar Eclipse Path over Tennessee

Time of eclipse in Tennessee ranges from 1:24 pm CDT - 2:36 pm EDT
Read more about the eclipse in Tennessee >

Tennessee Solar Eclipse Path

 

Total Eclipse Events in Knoxville


Knoxville Mercury's
Tips for Viewing the Eclipse

Read the full Knoxville Mercury article >

1. ACQUIRE SOLAR ECLIPSE GLASSES

Here’s the straight scoop on the relationship between solar eclipses and your eyeballs: during the Totality—that is, the two minutes or so in which the moon has completely covered the sun—it’s safe to behold the phenomenon with the naked eye. However, glasses should be worn at all times on either side of those two minutes. Luckily, solar eclipse glasses are readily available and cheap. (You can find them on Amazon in every conceivable flavor.)

2. MAKE SURE YOU’RE IN THE PATH OF THE TOTALITY

Nearly all of the continental United States will experience some degree of eclipse on August 21st. To witness a total eclipse, however, you’ll need to be within the 70-mile-wide path of totality. Luckily for all of us who couldn’t make it out of our own homes without the aid of GPS, the good folks at NASA have mapped out the eclipse’s precise trajectory.

If you’re on the fence about whether to make the extra effort or not, Littmann recommends that you spring for it. “The difference between 99 percent and 100 percent,” he says, “is all the difference in the world.”

3. PICKING A SPOT TO WATCH: START BIG, AND KEEP YOUR OPTIONS OPEN

Remember: Mother Nature doesn’t care how special the eclipse on August 21st is to you or anyone else. For her, it will be business as usual, meaning that any number of weather events could come between you and the action. The best way to work around this reality is to decide broadly where you want to see the eclipse and make arrangements to be in that location as far ahead of time as possible, but stay flexible and mobile right up to the event itself.

“I’ll be watching the eclipse in the Sweetwater area,” says Nathan Phillip, Vice-President of UT’s Ask a Scientist Chapter. “There are a lot of highways down there, so I’ll have plenty of options for getting the best possible look at the eclipse. I won’t know exactly where I’ll be watching until the 21st.”

4. ON THE DAY: PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE WEATHER

We all know that the weather can change on a dime, especially during summertime in this part of the country. However, the state of the skies on the morning of the 21st will provide some indication of what the afternoon holds, if you know what to look for.

The most pertinent piece of advice I can offer you is also the most obvious: in the days and hours running up to the eclipse, keep eye on the weather forecast. All joking about the reliability of weathermen aside, it’s the best way to make sure you’ll be in a position to behold this natural wonder

 

Fun Facts of the Day about the Total Eclipse

Read more fun solar eclipse facts of the day >

 

TN Solar Eclipse  TN Solar Eclipse  TN Solar Eclipse

 

 

Learn More about the Total Eclipse